Disney and Circle: Childproofing the Internet

Child safety is a billion dollar industry. Everyday parents consider the security of cars they drive, their homes, and even the schools their children go to. You can put rubber bumpers on all the sharp corners in your home and drive a car with the highest safety ratings but how do you filter the cesspool that is the internet? CYBERsitter has claimed to block 2.5 million adult sites. About 4% (the 90% stat is a myth) of the Internets most popular websites are pornographic and that isn’t including adult content not appropriate for children. Circle and Disney has partnered to create a solution.

Image: Circle

Image: Circle

Circle recently announced Circle with Disney, a device the should allow the user complete control of devices on their network while at the same time giving you access to tons of Disney music and videos. Once wireless connected to your network the device allows you to create filters for the different users in your home. While parents can have free reign to explore the internet , children and teenagers would use the internet, each under their own set of rules. Not only limited to the web it also allows parents to set a time limit on internet use or cut off points when they would rather them be doing something else, monitor the apps used and content accessed on tablets and mobile devices, and even block ads.

circle4

Image: Circle

The idea may sound familiar to those who remember the failed Skydog router which was axed by Comcast. This device could have went that way too thanks to a failed kickstarter campaign. “Kickstarter was what I like to call a really great failure,” says Circle Media founder Jelani Memory. Failing to raise the funds needed they went back to the drawing board, and not only improved the app but got a partnership with Disney for their trouble. With many improvements made over the last to years the 3.25 inch device could make a big splash in the market place and is currently on sale now for $99.

Image: Circle

Image: Circle

How does Circle work? The device uses a old black hat technique used for man in the middle hacks called ARP spoofing. The device intercepts and inspects network packets sent from connected devices, and grants or blocks access based off the users preferences. The information they claim, is secure and encrypted and isn’t being stored on a cloud. The device should also be safe for other networked devices and shouldn’t interfere with their use or slow down your internet connection.

Circle also announced a service called Circle Go which should be available sometime early 2016, that allows you to monitor iOS devices outside of the home.

About the Author

Reg Calixte
Reg Calixte

Editor-in-Chief
@LTLENG

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