Facebook & VR

Image: Google

With a focus on VR in on the rise from newsfeeds to personal sharing technology giants and social media moguls alike want to step into the world of virtual reality and stay there. The important question however is what difference does it make? The answer is manifold from people sharing their own experiences to newsfeeds and adverts all these streams are a recipe for success. Cashing out on them it seems isn’t that far beyond within the business scope as well. Consider for instance Facebook with a valuation of over $3 Billion dollars and users crossing the usual benchmark of other groups such as Twitter and Tinder, Facebook has recently unveiled its own brand of VR.

Designing and putting together its own VR camera, it’s gone a bit further. The camera offered by Facebook is literally open source. You are able to download the specs online and buy the parts which cost around $30,000 at present. With the design mechanics of a UFO, 17 cameras and numerous angels – techies can put this camera together themselves and start shooting! It’s seamless and doesn’t require much editing post shoot as well.

Image: Facebook

Image: Facebook

So – what was Facebook really thinking?

The answer to that question is simple as well, they wanted to increase the number of VR’s being posted online via various other devices and more than that Facebook wanted it’s on foothold in the market. Have they achieved that?

I believe so, but we’ll need to wait and see as well. You’d probably also need to compare the various cameras and devices out there with Facebook’s own Surround 360 17-Lens 3D VR Camera. But on the outset it looks all good. The camera’s 17 4 megapixel lenses can shoot anywhere between 4K and 8K videos. What’s more it lends itself to the genius of production by dumping data at 30 Gigabit per second either to a hard drive or straight to a USB or flash. Facebook didn’t only consider the technology behind it but also the outlook – which is pretty much durable with an aluminum casing which can assembled quickly and vice versa and what’s more they’ve taken into consideration the physical aspects of shooting a frame as well.

What’s left behind?

Acceptability – probably, either lack off or too of it. For this we’d probably need to wait and see exactly how many people actually download and order the parts to start using it.

About the Author

Reg Calixte
Reg Calixte
Editor-in-Chief @LTLENG

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